American Lake Labeled a Monumental Threat Following Hurricane Harvey's Floods [VIDEO]
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American Lake Labeled a Monumental Threat Following Hurricane Harvey’s Floods [VIDEO]

A very unusual and quite terrifying phenomenon has been spotted at one of America’s greatest water surfaces, Lake Texoma, settled between the Texas and Oklahoma border. Namely, this phenomenon has been proven powerful enough to drag a ship down to the bottom of the lake. A vortex of 8-feet width was immediately noticed at the lake, indicating a serious problem the authorities need to deal with ASAP.

Initially, the vortex brought horror to locals and tourist in the area, but its occurrence has a logical explanation that comes with it.

It has been reported the lake is being drained as we speak, given the fact the water is created by a buildup of water at Denison Dam on the Red River., is being drained.

Assistant lake manager at Lake Texoma, BJ Parkey, explained the miraculous occurrence in detail. As he said, the lake water levels rise significantly, so the Army Corps opens floodgates at the lake’s bottom to take the water out and drain it into the Red River. The drain itself is a petrifying sight to observe- the power it holds in never to be taken lightly.

“Just like in your house when you fill a bathtub full of water and [open] the drain, it will develop a vortex or whirlpool,” Parkey said.

Lake Manager Joe Custer noted the vortex is very similar to a whirlpool. However, due to its size and immense power, the whirlpool can drag down and sink a standard-sized boat. “That’s why we have the warning signs and buoy lines. People need to understand it’s a very dangerous situation,” he explained.

Due to massive floods in the region, as a result of Hurricane Harvey’s impact, the vortex gained even more power.

Lake Texoma’s waters rose to up to 646-feet above sea level, as per KXII. reported.

“Once we’re back within our flood control pool, under elevation 640, then we’ll reduce the flow out of the floodgates so we can reduce the flooding downstream,” Custer said.

Even though the thought of it seems larger than life, these occurrences are never to be taken lightly.

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